Prisma Pal Meditations for Kids: Confidence & Loving-Kindness

GoZen! presents the Prisma Pal Meditations. With the help of several animal friends, children are led through yoga, breath, and visualization exercises focused on the seven main chakras, or energy centers in the body. The two meditations you see below are from our latest animated series that is currently in production. We would LOVE your honest feedback on these meditations. Feel free to let us know what you think in the comments – thank you!

Leave us feedback in the comments. Feel free to answer any of these questions or leave general feedback:

  • What are your overall thoughts?
  • What age range do you think these meditations are geared towards?
  • Would you use these at home or in a classroom?
  • Would you like to see changes to this meditation? Feel free to be specific!
About Renee Jain

Renee Jain is an award-winning tech entrepreneur turned speaker and certified life coach. She also holds a masters in applied positive psychology from the University of Pennsylvania. Renee specializes in cultivating skills of resilience in both adults and children. Her passion is taking research-based concepts and transforming them into fun and digestible learning modules. For children, she has created one-of-a-kind anxiety relief programs at GoZen! delivered via engaging animated shorts.

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46 thoughts on “Prisma Pal Meditations for Kids: Confidence & Loving-Kindness”

  1. I showed the videos to my 8-year-old who really does not like meditation or yoga. He didn’t like the elephant video. It was too similar to other meditation videos and there was too much talking. He was reluctant to admit it but I think he did like the lion video. He didn’t completely understand the idea of tightening his tummy or that the lion was doing that during the pose but I think he liked that there was movement and that helped him stay focused. It was challenging but not impossible.

    To answer your questions, I think the lion video is good for elementary but the elephant would be better for toddlers (it reminds me of Daniel Tiger). I could see the lion video being used in schools as well as at home. Could movement be added to the elephant video? I’d love to see more meditation/ mindfulness videos like the lion video. I think they are the perfect mix for my 8-year-old son.

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    • Hi! My kids loved these. My 12 year old thought they were very sweet but felt they were for younger kids. He said he prefers Orby’s meditations from WAVE for panic. My 6 year old really liked them, especially the elephant one! She said she really loved the parts where you pictured someone you love. One thing that confused her (being 6) was the phrase “someone who could benefit from”. Both kids really enjoyed bear hugging themselves and repeating the positive mantras. I did notice we had a hard time finishing repeating the mantra before the animal would start talking again, but this didn’t seem to bother my kids. I really liked the chakra business. Neither of my kids had heard of them and they were very were curious to know more. Thanks so much for the preview!!!

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  2. I think the vudeos are good for children. However,i don’t like the reference to ‘superpowers’. I think sticking to ‘centres of good (or positive) energy’ is better.

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  3. The terms Meditation and Yoga have caused confusion and can have a very negative reaction. Many, who are uninformed, believe that there is some religious affiliation or connotation when these terms are used. I have found, in our public school setting, that when the terms “focused attention” and “mindfulness” are used to describe the same activities, they are received much more positively.

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  4. This is a great idea! Too much talking for younger kids. I did not like how the tiger did not ever face the viewer while he was talking to us. He’s facing and looking away from the viewer. Videos for middle school and high school kids would be great also!

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  5. I like the idea of this relaxation video. I just wish it wasn’t talking about Chakras and other references to what may be perceived as Eastern religion by parents of students. I am a counselor in K-2 public school and we have to be SO careful that we are not crossing any lines that may offend and concern parents.
    I am sure that these will have application in the private sector, nicely done.

    They just might not be for public school with the references to Chakras and superpowers etc.

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  6. I agree with the Chakra comment. I’m not sure that is something that I feel comfortable bringing into the public school that I work in. I LOVE the animals and the mediations.
    I’m looking forward to showing my 9 year old daughter, who is really struggling right now, and getting her opinion. I will give more feedback if she has something more to say.
    Thanks for all the great work that you do.

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  7. Agreed very much so about the Chakra piece for the exact same reasons! I actually stopped watching it as soon as that was mentioned because I knew I wouldn’t be able to use the videos in in any of my schools, unfortunately.

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  8. I agree with Danielle. I am a school social worker K-5. We cannot even refer to calming down with yoga as yoga. We call it stretching for relaxation. I really loved the videos and the cute animation. If you could rename the chakras , that would work. IE listen to your body’s feelings, energy, stress or tensions, etc. Thanks so much for all your strategies for dealing with anxiety. Love them!!

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  9. Love the concept! I think it’s a little “young” for my tween but good for 10 and under? Maybe an audio version for older kids with some basic concepts about ‘letting go’ and soothing sounds to help encourage visualization and aid in calming, relaxing or remembering to breathe when stress starts creeping in. Especially during school where triggers are so unpredictable– it would be lovely for kids to conjure up scenery, mantras, thoughts or a system to self-calm and power through the day. Thanks for recognizing and tackling the struggle kids with anxiety face!

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  10. I showed this to my Kindergarten classroom after recess. It helped settle them down to focus on the next activity. They loved it. They can’t wait to watch the elephant tomorrow. Here are some of their comments:
    “The lion was cool. I liked when he talked about his super power.”
    “I liked the breathing. I can do that.”
    “The poses were fun.”
    “His voice was nice.”

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  11. Personally I think it’s great to use the original words linked to these practices. When we translate (erase origin of words/origin of culture) in order to make things more comfortable, acceptable or mainstream, something is lost. We should embrace difference and welcome ‘other’ into a space where curiosity and compassion attend. I live in New Zealand, so it is interesting to hear of the restrictions put in place in public schools, in America. What a beautiful gift we have been given in these practices. I also appreciate the dilemma faced by teachers who have to adhere to such rules. Just my thoughts. Keep up the great work.

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  12. My seven year old daughter really enjoyed both videos! She liked the messages of each one and they definitely lifted her spirits. She said her favorite was the Lion video โ€˜because there was more to doโ€™, but she is a kiddo that loves yoga. Iโ€™m looking forward to the rest of the videos! I love the chakra theme.

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  13. Personally, I think this is GREAT Renee. I can’t wait to show it to my kids after school today. They would enjoy it as this is different and fun. It’s good idea to introduce kids to cakra (I will find the easiest way to explain it to them). I have 3 kids (12,9,7 years old). If we doing it together I can imagine that 4 of us can do it together. But individually, probably my daughter would not kin to do it ;-). After all…weldone and keep up a good work. Cant wait for your next creation.
    All the best and GBU

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  14. I work with children with attention difficulties and language disorder many of whom are very stressed, and they really enjoy mindfulness activities accompanied by visuals, (rather than just audio) so I will certainly trial these.
    I wondered if you could do an introductory video that runs for only three or four minutes before the children can build up to 5 or 6 minutes? Perhaps make the language simpler in a shorter video and more complex language in the longer video. I like the way the lion moves so the children don’t have to sit still in one place for the whole 5 minutes.
    Yoga and Meditation is very popular in Australia, but referencing chakra’s would be considered a bit “New Age”.

    Perhaps also include in a video a graphic where the children can see the breath going in and out of the animal’s body down to their lungs / diaphragm to help them understand the importance of focusing on their breath?

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  15. Hello, I have a 12 year old and she won’t watch the animation videos. I wonder if, for older kids, there could be an actual person of their age, showing them the same techniques.

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  16. I agree with the comments regarding “Chakra”. I now work in a parochial (Catholic) school but previously I worked in public schools. I use meditation/relaxation/breathing techniques with students K-8 but I rarely use the word meditation and I can’t imagine referring to chakras would be well received. I’m afraid too many people associate the term with Eastern philosophies or religions. There is, however, an openness to learning “stress reduction” techniques and learning about mind-body connections. It’s a little bit like “hiding” vegetables in food when kids are young and maybe not open to eating vegetables. They get the benefit of the vegetables but don’t necessarily need to know they are eating squash ;).

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  17. I enjoyed these videos and feel that the visuals are wonderful, especially for those younger children. I enjoyed the elephant video message, learning to love yourself and others is huge for children today and love to see this awareness/mindset start young. The ages it seems appropriate depend on developmental age for me. I typically could see this for 2-7 year olds. I liked both videos but think the Lion video could have been more relaxing with nature sounds to fit the back ground. I do agree with the comments on “chakra” unfortunately that is a very real problem with utilization in schools. Perhaps referring to this as “heart center” etc. would allow for meaning to be conveyed without schools discounting these great video learning tools for kids because of logistics/school policy with terminology.

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  18. Today my kindergarten class watched Esme Elephant. This is what they had to say:
    “I liked that she talked about her heart.”
    “The green light coming from the heart was cool, like Green Lantern.”
    “The elephant was caring.”
    “I loved it.”
    “It made me feel good.”

    I agree with the other suggestions, change chakras to “Mindfulness” or “Super Power” and it will be easier for all types to participate. I love the “hiding the vegetables” idea. ๐Ÿ™‚

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  19. Lion-
    I really like the Lion Meditation. I like how the lion’s third Chakra gets imprinted on his tummy so we have a focal point for our meditations session. The back drop of the Lion’s landscape is very beautiful full of bright yellow and gold. I do not hear a lion when I am listening to his meditation, it sounds like a professor in a cashmere sweater or a young adjunct in a button down shirt and jeans. I like the idea of getting us to drop to our knees and span out are leg and arms on opposite sides of our body. I also like the positive affirmations we are speaking as it feels like they are getting embedded into our subconscious as we speak them. I can see myself thinking, “I am great and confident”, as i step outside to go work on the car and figure out how to get it running later today.

    Elephant – The elephant and green background are great positive sight. It brings to mind tropical jungle and the elephant’s trunk brings to mind swinging pendulum. I like the elephant’s prerogative of thinking and emphasizing the meditative affirmation, “I am love” and invoking a wish to embrace and spread love or kindness to all.

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  20. We did the lion one. My 4 year old said he loved it. My 7 and 10 didn’t like it. Maybe because they tried to do it without looking at the screen and couldn’t follow. It caught my attention the fact that in a meditation they needed to follow so many instructions and needed to look at the image. Instead of focusing on the words they were looking at the lion all the time. It was lovely but maybe so much that it distracted them. Thanks.

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  21. I absolutely love the ideas of these videos I was just previewing them first then my 3 yr old came over and absolutely Loved the elephant one and even just jumped right in and started the breathing excercises she also loved the ending of hugging yourself. The Lion one was too hard for her to follow and she lost interest quickly. My 11 yr old actually liked the Lion one and said “that’s pretty cool, I liked how he talked about the energy inside” but he did say it was slighty kiddish but enjoyed the lion one enough to still do it!

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  22. I think these meditations are not only helpful but much needed! There are kids who are being raised to be bullies and eventually they are the ones who will become managers, humiliating, berating and threatening others at work. So the kids who watch these videos will need to learn coping skills starting at an early age, for the real life at workplaces are not as rosy as Mr. Peanut and Mrs. M&M pretends to be.

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